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Women's Health USA 2013 An illustrated collection of current and historical data, published annually.

Nutrition

Narrative

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends eating a variety of nutrient-dense foods while not exceeding caloric needs.1 Nutrient- dense foods include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and poultry, eggs, beans, and peas. Studies have shown that people who frequently eat fast foods are less likely to consume these nutrient-dense foods and more likely to be obese.2

In 2007–2010, based on two non-consecutive 24-hour dietary recalls, 43.2 percent of women reported that they had consumed fast food on any given day compared to 49.8 percent of men. On average, however, both women and men who ate fast food consumed roughly one fourth of their total daily calories from such items (data not shown in graph images or in data tables on this site). Fast food consumption decreased with age. For example, 59.1 percent of women aged 18–24 years reported fast food consumption on any given day which declined to 22.9 percent among women aged 65 and older. Over half of non-Hispanic Black women consumed fast food on any given day (55.5 percent), followed by 47.8 percent of Mexican American women, and 41.4 percent of non-Hispanic White women (data not shown in graph images or in data tables on this site).

In addition to fast food, it is recommended that adults limit their intake of sugar-sweetened beverages, such as non-diet soda, flavored water, energy drinks, and sports drinks, because these items provide excess calories with little nutritional value3 and have been associated with an increased risk of obesity and diabetes.4

In 2007–2010, men were more likely than women to have consumed sugar-sweetened beverages on any given day (57.2 and 48.5 percent, respectively). Sugar-drink consumption varied by household income. For example, about 60 percent of women with household incomes of less than 200 percent of poverty consumed sugar drinks compared to 36.3 percent of women with incomes of 400 percent or more of poverty. With respect to race and ethnicity, sugar-drink consumption ranged from 43.2 percent among non-Hispanic White women to 66.1 percent among non-Hispanic Black women (data not shown in graph images or in data tables on this site). Find more data on fruit and vegetable consumption at Women’s Health USA 2012, Nutrition.

1 U.S. Department of Agriculture link leaves hrsa.gov site, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services link leaves hrsa.gov site. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. 7th ed. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office; 2010. Accessed 09/20/13.

2 Bowman SA, Vinyard BT. Fast food consumption of U.S. adults: Impact on energy and nutrient intakes and overweight status. J Am Col Nutr. 2004;23(2):163–8.

3 U.S. Department of Agriculture link leaves hrsa.gov site, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services link leaves hrsa.gov site. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. 7th ed. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office; 2010. Accessed 09/20/13.

4 Harvard School of Public Health link leaves hrsa.gov site. Sugary Drinks and Obesity Fact Sheet. Accessed 09/20/13.

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Graphs

Data

Fast Food Consumption* Among Adults Aged 18 and Older, by Age and Sex, 2007–2010
Age Group Percent of Adults, Female Percent of Adults, Male
*Estimates are based on two non-consecutive 24-hour dietary recalls; fast food includes foods with the source of food coded as “restaurant fast food/pizza;” total estimates are age-adjusted.
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2010. Analysis conducted by the Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology and Statistics Program.
18-24 Years 59.1 63.9
25-44 Years 48.5 57.5
45-64 Years 40.8 45.7
65 Years and Older 22.9 28.3
Total 43.2 49.8
Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption* Among Adults Aged 18 and Older, by Poverty Level and Sex,** 2007–2010
Poverty Level Percent of Adults, Female Percent of Adults, Male
*Estimates are based on two non-consecutive 24-hour dietary recalls; sugar drinks include fruit drinks, sodas, energy drinks, sports drinks, and sweetened bottled waters and do not include diet drinks, 100% fruit juice, sweetened teas, and flavored milks; all estimates are age-adjusted.
**Poverty level, defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, was $22,314 for a family of four in 2010.
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2007-2010. Analysis conducted by the Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology and Statistics Program.
Less than 100% of Poverty 61.1 64.7
100-199% of Poverty 57.3 62.4
200-399% of Poverty 46.1 61.1
400% or More of Poverty 36.3 50.3
Total 48.5 57.2