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Women's Health USA 2013 An illustrated collection of current and historical data, published annually.

Health Insurance

Narrative

People who are uninsured face substantial financial barriers to health care, which can result in delayed diagnoses and poor health outcomes, including premature death.1 Overall, 15.7 percent or 48.6 million people in the United States lacked health insurance in 2011, a decline from 16.3 percent in 2010.2 Adults aged 18 and older accounted for 86 percent of all uninsured individuals in 2011 and have higher rates of uninsurance than children due to more limited eligibility for public insurance (17.7 versus 9.4 percent, respectively; data for children not shown). In 2011, women were less likely than men to be uninsured (16.1 versus 19.5 percent, respectively). Women are more likely to be in poverty (Find more at Women and Poverty.) and to qualify for Medicaid insurance available to low-income individuals who are pregnant, children, parents, elderly, or disabled.3,4 Younger adults were most likely to be uninsured—about one in four adults under age 45 lacked health insurance compared to 16.3 percent of those aged 45–64 years and only 1.7 percent of those aged 65 and older, most of whom are eligible for Medicare coverage.

Among women aged 18–64 years in 2011, 67.3 percent had some form of private insurance, 13.2 percent had only public insurance, and 19.5 percent were uninsured. This distribution varied by race and ethnicity with non-Hispanic White women having the highest rates of any private insurance coverage (75.4 percent), compared to 55.2 percent of non-Hispanic Black women and less than half of non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native and Hispanic women (46.6 and 45.3 percent, respectively). Public coverage alone was most common among non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native women (21.9 and 23.5 percent, respectively). The highest rates of uninsurance were among Hispanic women and non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native women (37.4 and 30.0 percent, respectively).

Of the nearly 13 million women aged 18–64 who rely on publicly-funded insurance, over two-thirds are covered by Medicaid alone, while 13.1 percent are covered by Medicare alone, and 10.3 percent have dual coverage. Another 9.4 percent rely on some other form of public coverage, including insurance from the military (data not shown in graph images or in data tables on this site).

1 Kaiser Family Foundation link leaves hrsa.gov site. The Uninsured: A Primer. Washington, DC: Kaiser Family Foundation; October 1, 2012. Accessed 04/23/13.

2 DeNavas-Walt, Carmen, Bernadette D. Proctor, and Jessica C. Smith, U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Reports, P60-243, Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office; 2012.

3 Kaiser Family Foundation link leaves hrsa.gov site. The Uninsured: A Primer. Washington, DC: Kaiser Family Foundation; October 1, 2012. Accessed 04/23/13.

4 Kaiser Family Foundation link leaves hrsa.gov site. Visualizing Health Policy: The Role of Medicaid and Medicare in Women’s Health Care. Washington, DC: Kaiser Family Foundation; May 15, 2013.  Accessed 05/25/13.

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Graphs

Data

Adults Aged 18 and Older Without Health Insurance, by Age and Sex, 2011
Age Group Percent of Adults, Female Percent of Adults, Male Percent of Adults, Total
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (CPS) Table Creator II for the Annual Social and Economic Supplement.
18-24 Years 23.5 27.3 25.4
25-44 Years 21.9 27.3 24.6
45-64 Years 15.9 16.8 16.3
65 Years and Older 1.6 1.7 1.7
Total 16.1 19.5 17.7
Health Insurance Coverage of Women Aged 18-64, by Race/Ethnicity and Health Insurance Coverage,* 2011
Race/Ethnicity Percent of Women, Private Insurance Percent of Women, Public Insurance (Includes federal programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, and military health care, and individual state health plans) Percent of Women, Uninsured
*Private coverage includes persons with any private insurance, either alone or in combination with public coverage; public includes those covered only by government programs such as Medicaid, Medicare, military plans, and state-sponsored health plans. Estimates may not add to 100 due to rounding.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey (CPS) Table Creator II for the Annual Social and Economic Supplement.
Non-Hispanic White 75.4 10.5 14.2
Non-Hispanic Black 55.2 21.9 22.9
Hispanic 45.3 17.3 37.4
Non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native 46.6 23.5 30.0
Non-Hispanic Asian 69.8 9.6 20.6
Non-Hispanic Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander 68.6 12.9 18.5
Non-Hispanic Multiple Race 60.1 18.8 21.1
Total 67.3 13.2 19.5