Maternal and Child Health Research Program

H H S Department of Health and Human Services
Health Resources and Services Administration

Facebook YouTube HRSA eNews Mobile Apps

A-Z Index  |   Questions?  

Advancing Applied MCH Research

  • Print this
  • Email this

Autism Intervention Research Network on Behavioral Health (AIR-B Network)

Funded Projects Search

 
 
Advanced Search >>

Project Number: UA3 MC 11055-04
Grantee: UCLA
Department/Center: Education
Project Date: 9/1/2008

Final Report

Pending

Principal Investigator

Connie Kasari, Ph.D.
Professor
11000 Kinross Avenue, Suite 102
Los Angeles, CA  90095
Phone: 310-825-8342
Email: kasari@gseis.ucla.edu

Age

  • Toddlerhood (1-2 years)
  • Early Childhood (3-5 years)
  • Middle Childhood (6-11 years)
  • Adolescence (12-18 years)

Abstract

Problem: Proven-efficacious autism interventions are complicated to deliver, intensive and expensive. As a result, community practice rarely mirrors the evidence base for autism intervention. This research-to-practice gap reflects a fundamental challenge to traditional university-based intervention research, which rarely examines the effectiveness (as opposed to efficacy) of interventions, and even less commonly examines strategies to implement interventions in community settings so that they sustain. Challenges to implementation are exacerbated among in poor school districts; these districts, which provide the bulk of intervention to children with autism, rarely have the capacity to deliver proven-efficacious interventions as they were designed. Our AIR-B network has developed and tested interventions to address autism's core symptoms. A central part of our mission is to broaden the diversity of research contexts to assess generalizability of our interventions. We now move from testing interventions to partnering with a diverse array of school districts and other community settings to develop and test strategies to ensure that these interventions are effectively implemented in community settings. Goals/Objectives: To identify barriers and to advance strategies for the deployment of evidence-based interventions for core features of autism effectively and sustainably in under-resourced schools and communities with highly diverse and underserved children. Methodology: Using innovative techniques from implementation science and community-based participatory research, we will establish partnerships with local schools, involve community members (administration, teachers, support staff, parents) in identifying and responding to priorities, and develop manualized protocols for deployment and training. We will then deploy the selected evidence-based interventions and evaluate the effects of the deployment strategies on community practices and child outcomes. In other Network activities, we will study the use of efficacious interventions with under-served children with ASD through analysis of our archived AIR-B I data, as well as through new initiatives driven by our collaborating partners. Coordination: In this competing continuation of AIR-B we continue our original AIR-B collaborations with: University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) as the lead site, University of Michigan; University of Washington; Florida State University; and Kennedy Krieger Institute. We also propose two new partners, the University of Pennsylvania and University of Rochester. The PIs at these sites form a team that is at the forefront in the areas of autism screening, identification, and intervention development and implementation research. Additionally, we will work closely with other networks, including LEND, DBP, AIR-P, and ATN, many already connected with our team of collaborating research entities. Evaluation: Quantitative and qualitative implementation science methods will be employed to test the effectiveness and sustainability of evidence based practices in community settings. Additional studies will employ other methodologies to validate tools, test efficacy and barriers to access in archived AIR-B data (based on randomized controlled trials) as well as new data collection in pilot projects to be determined. Annotation: The proposed Network will provide a model for moving evidence-based psychosocial interventions for children with autism from research to under-resourced practice settings. If successful, the Network will increase the use of proven-effective interventions for children with autism, improving outcomes for these children, and increase inclusion of traditionally under-represented research participants.

Publications

Listed is descending order by year published.

Dean M, Adams G, Kasari C. How narrative difficulties build peer rejection: a discourse analysis of a girl with autism and her female peers. Discourse Studies. 2013 Apr;15(2):147-66. doi: 10.1177/1461445612471472

Kasari C, Smith T. Interventions in schools for children with autism spectrum disorder: methods and recommendations. Autism. 2013 May;17(3):254-67. doi: 10.1177/1362361312470496. Epub 2013 Apr 16. PubMed PMID: 23592848.

Adkins KW, Goldman SE, Fawkes D, et al. A pilot study of shoulder placement for actigraphy in children. Behavioral Sleep Medicine. 2012;10(2):138-147.

Adkins KW, Molloy C, Weiss SK, et al. Effects of a standardized pamphlet on insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders. Pediatrics. 2012;130(suppl 2):S139.

Bohlander AJ, Orlich F, Varley, CK. Social skills training for children with autism. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2012 Feb;59(1):165-74, xii. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2011.10.001

Kasari C, Gulsrud A, Freeman S, Paparella T, Hellemann G. Longitudinal follow up of children with autism receiving targeted interventions on joint attention and play. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 2012; 51: 487-495.

Kasari C, Patterson S. Interventions addressing social impairment in autism. Current Psychiatry Reports. 2012; 14: 713-725.

Kasari C, Rotheram-Fuller E, Locke J, Gulsrud A. Making the connection: randomized controlled trial of social skills at school for children with autism spectrum disorders. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;53(4):431-9.

Lawton K, Kasari C. Brief report: longitudinal improvements in the quality of joint attention in preschool children with autism. J Autism Dev Disord. 2012 Feb;42(2):307-12. doi: 10.1007/s10803-011-1231-z.

Locke J, Rotheram-Fuller E, Kasari C. Exploring the social impact of being a typical peer model for included children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities. 2012; 42:1895-1905.

Lord C, Jones RM. Annual research review: re-thinking the classification of autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. 2012;53(5):490-509.

Maglione MA, Gans D, Das L, et al. Nonmedical interventions for children with ASD: recommended guidelines and further research needs. Pediatrics. 2012;130(suppl 2):S169-S178.

Kasari, C., Locke, J., Gulsrud, A., & Rotheram-Fuller, E. Social networks and friendships at school: Comparing children with and without Autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 2011May; 41(5):533-44.

Kasari C, Lawton K. New directions in behavioral treatment of autism spectrum disorders. Curr Opin Neurol. 2010 Apr;23(2):137-43.

Kasari C, Lawton K. New directions in behavioral treatment of autism spectrum disorders. Curr Opin Neurol. 2010 Apr;23(2):137-43.

Lawton, K. & Kasari, C. Social development and intervention in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Young Exceptional Children. 2010; 12: 66-74.

Keywords

Autism, Developmental Disabilities, Social & Emotional Development, Special Health Care Needs, Early Intervention, Cognitive & Linguistic Development

Back To Top